Globalization

Dr. Wolfgang Streeck: “We are being governed by an oligarchy”

Publié le Mis à jour le

Dr. Wolfgang Streeck. DR.

Mohsen Abdelmoumen: Can Europe survive the Covid-19 crisis?

Dr. Wolfgang Streeck: It depends on what you mean by “survive“. Complex societies don‘t “die“; something always remains—the question is: what? If you mean the European Union or the European Monetary Union, will they still exist when the virus has left? Of course. If you ask if the virus is undermining them, I think one must not forget that both EU and EMU were already undermining themselves before the pandemic; remember Brexit? Also remember the tensions between Germany and the Mediterranean countries, and between Germany in particular and the new, peripheral member states in the East. The pandemic may or may not have accelerated the decay of “Europe“ as an international organization, or institution; but apart from this and more importantly, the virus has not derailed older tendencies of development that are too deeply rooted politically and economically to be undone by a tiny virus.

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Dr. Immanuel Ness: “Imperialist wars benefit big capitalists in the most affluent states”

Publié le Mis à jour le

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Dr. Immanuel Ness. DR.

Mohsen Abdelmoumen: In your very interesting book: Choke Points: Logistics Workers Disrupting the Global Supply Chain, you argue that global capitalism is a precarious system. Can you explain why?

Dr. Immanuel Ness: The global economy is increasingly integrated in the production industry and as such, individual nations are highly integrated for inputs which are instrumental in transforming natural resources into fabricated elements in commodities.  This system is highly dependent on the transportation of goods throughout the world.  In this way, workers who are employed in logistics and the moving of goods are integral to the continued flow of commodities throughout the world.  As goods are more and more produced for specific consumer and market demands in destination countries in the Global North, any disruption in this system scuppers the supply of goods. Logistic workers are crucial in the distribution of fabricated goods throughout the supply chain, and thus, have the potential to interrupt the delivery of commodities in various stages of production. Lire la suite »

Dr. Jacques Sapir: « The struggle for the sovereignty of Nations is now decisive »

Publié le Mis à jour le

Jacques Sapir

Dr. Jacques Sapir. DR.

Mohsen Abdelmoumen: In your book « Les économistes contre la Démocratie: Pouvoir, Mondialisation et Démocratie » (Economists Against Democracy: Power, Globalization and Democracy), you are very critical of economists. Can you explain why?

Dr. Jacques Sapir: It is mainly because economists have appropriated a power that is not theirs. They have indeed penetrated the inner workings of the ruling apparatus. This is true at the State level, as to that of major international organizations, whether it is in the European Union, the OECD or the WTO. They are thus increasingly inclined to intervene on all social and political problems. But when they occur, it is by mixing an experts position and a position of political actors. This poses an immediate problem. Lire la suite »

Pr. Peter Phillips: « We face a century of fascism »

Publié le Mis à jour le

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Professor Peter Phillips. DR.

Mohsen Abdelmoumen: In your writings, you qualify the XXI century, the century of Fascism. How did we get there?

Pr. Peter Phillips: 9/11 set the stage for a global war on terror and increased police state in the US and abroad. We face a century of fascism unless major social democracy movements intercede. The mechanism of state democracy and elections in the US and most other places are nothing more than theater on a grand scale. Lire la suite »

Prof. Saskia Sassen: « They are about 100 cities which are being bought up in bits and pieces »

Publié le Mis à jour le

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Professor Saskia Sassen. DR.

Mohsen Abdelmoumen: In your works, you refer to the « Global City ». Can we oppose the Global City to the State?

Professor Saskia Sassen: In some ways, yes. It is a good question, and one I am rarely asked. It is a kind of triangulation between state – global city – global economy+global culture/politics/movements. The global city emerges partly as a result or outcome of privatization and deregulation of sectors that used to be part of the function of the state, as in public sector entities. The combination of deregulation, allowing firms to move far more freely across borders, and privatization (more entities once in the public sector are now private), means that what used to be state functions are now business functions. Out of that comes the shift form state to city. Lire la suite »