Western Sahara

Hands down on the wealth of the Sahrawi people by the Moroccan Makhzen

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The Makhzen and its accomplices plunder the Sahrawi fish wealth. D.R.

On September 22, 2022, the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights dealt a heavy blow to the Moroccan Makhzen by issuing a judgment declaring that Morocco’s occupation of Western Sahara is a violation of the right to self-determination and freedom. independence and that all States have an obligation to help the people of Western Sahara in their struggle for self-determination. “The Respondent States, and indeed all States Parties to the Charter and Protocol, as well as all AU Member States have a responsibility under international law to find a permanent solution to the occupation and to ensure the enjoyment of the inalienable right to self-determination of the Sahrawi people, to do nothing which would recognize such occupation as lawful or which would prevent them from enjoying this right”, https://www.african-court.org/cpmt/storage/app/uploads/public/632/e0f/3ad/632e0f3ad580e748464681.pdf

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The interview I gave to ProMozaik, published on July 5, 2020

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Link to the interview: https://promosaik.blogspot.com/2020/07/mohsen-abdelmoumen-racism-is-only-gross.html

Mohsen Abdelmoumen: « Racism is only the gross expression of filthy ignorance »

By Milena Rampoldi, ProMosaik. In the following my interview with Mohsen Abdelmoumen, a journalist focusing on matters which are very important to me, like Yemen, Western Sahara, Palestine and who also treats matters like human rights, even if this term as he says, is misused, ethics in journalism and the struggle against the discrimination of people because of their ethnic origin and religious orientation. Another important matter in this interview concerns the importance of anti-imperialist views which must not remain unexpressed by engaged journalists. Would like to thank Mohsen very much for his time and precious answers.

Why did you decide to become a journalist?

It’s always difficult to talk about oneself because I grew up and lived in a world where we rarely talk about ourselves. Furthermore, having experienced commitment and activism at a very young age, I have learned that when one becomes politically committed – especially by being on the revolutionary left – to just causes such as social justice, freedom, etc., one is not used to talking about oneself. On the contrary, we give much more than we receive. Concerning the circumstances, I think that to be a journalist, it took a combination of factors, a kind of destiny. I started when I was very young, writing for myself in Arabic and French. My political commitment pushed me into permanent reading, be it books or texts. A friend of mine who is an occupational doctor then suggested to set up a local newspaper with his friends in Béjaïa, Algeria. The project did not come to fruition, yet we had started to set up the administrative process and so on. In the meantime, I was in contact with an Algerian news agency to which I sent dispatches and articles about current events in the city where I was. They were very interested in my work. At that time, we were living through a war against terrorism in which hundreds of thousands of Algerians paid with their lives, and many of the projects I was considering did not succeed.

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Miguel Urbán Crespo: « Workers of the world, unite. This is the last call »

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Miguel Urbán Crespo . DR.

Mohsen Abdelmoumen: You called for a Covid tax on high net worth individuals and multinational corporations. Why? Didn’t the Covid-19 crisis show us the failure of the neoliberal model?

Miguel Urbán Crespo: The emergence of Covid was particularly deadly after decades of neo-liberal policies and cuts in public services and health care. The coronavirus has shown us that in centers and countries where more has been invested in health, there are fewer deaths, because, as we already knew, there is no better social shield than the protection of fundamental rights and the collective interest. The right to health has been reduced by neoliberal policies and the cost of this pandemic amounts to hundreds of thousands lives. Lire la suite »

Johannes Mosskin: “The humanitarian situation in Gaza is terrible”

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Johannes Mosskin. DR.

Mohsen Abdelmoumen: How and why did the idea come about to create the Right Livelihood Foundation that awards an alternative Nobel Prize?

Johannes Mosskin: The Right Livelihood Award was founded 40 years ago by the Swedish-German philanthropist Jakob von Uexkull. He was alarmed by the disconnect between the urgency of global problems and the way the international community was dealing with them. Von Uexkull saw how decision-makers were meeting behind closed doors, out of touch with reality. Activists and civil society organisations were at the same time gathering outside the meeting rooms, often presenting constructive solutions to the problems. However, their proposals were not taken seriously, and von Uexkull wanted to do something about it. Lire la suite »

Ana Gomes: “There is clearly a pro-Morocco lobby here in the European Parliament”

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Ms. Ana Gomes. DR.

Mohsen Abdelmoumen: You sit in the Subcommittee on Security and Defense and in the Special Commission on terrorism in the European Parliament. What do you think of European coordination in the fight against terrorism?

Ana Gomes: It has improved considerably since 2015, particularly since the terrorist attacks in France that hit the Bataclan. It existed before but it is especially since the Bataclan that the information exchange between police and intelligence services has developed. However, there is still a lot to do. The causes of terrorism, including the reasons for radicalization among Europeans, have not yet been sufficiently addressed – and I am not talking only about the Europeans who went to join Daesh in Syria and Iraq, but Europeans who attacked us here at home. Most are our fellow citizens who are born and have radicalized here, and I think that has a lot to do with neoliberal policies that have completely disinvested in social inclusion, especially for young people from immigrant communities, and so it was easier for terrorist groups to recruit unstable people for any reason. Lire la suite »

Wayne Madsen: « The CIA has always served the interests of Wall Street »

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Wayne Madsen. DR.

Mohsen Abdelmoumen: According to you, when we see the numerous demonstrations anti-Trump in the United States after the election of Donald Trump at the presidency, are we witnessing a colored revolution?

Wayne Madsen: It is classic Soros-funded color revolution. Soros is financing MoveOn.org, Black Lives Matter, Demos, and other of his groups to turn out protesters and is even running ads in papers looking for paid drivers and protest coordinators. Lire la suite »

Dr. William B. Quandt: « Algeria has to get through its next transition of power »

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Dr. W. Quandt

Dr. William B. Quandt. Dr.

Mohsen Abdelmoumen: Why Dr. Quandt is he interested in Algeria, notably through his two books: Between Ballots and Bullets: Algeria’s Transition from Authoritarianism, and Revolution and Political Leadership: Algeria, 1954-1968?

Dr. William B. Quandt: I was a student in France in 1961, just as the war in Algeria was coming to an end. A few years later I was graduate student at MIT and I was interested in how the newly independent countries would develop. I decided to study Algeria, partly because I was more or less fluent in French, and I was interested in the question of how a revolution can become a state. That led to my first book. Lire la suite »